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Monday, February 23, 2015

When Bad Things Happen to Patients ... And Discouraging Lawsuits

It has been a while since my last post, so, hello again reader (or hopefully and optimistically, readers).

I would like to continue on with my posts regarding medical malpractice lawsuits.  In the most recent article I read, the publisher again contradicts itself about "exploding" medical malpractice lawsuits.  However, the article then says "fewer than 10% of those patients and families will actually file a malpractice lawsuit."  The reason:  the author hypothesizes that it is the patient's or families perception of the doctor or staff.  Essentially, if they like the doctor or staff, or have been with a particular doctor for a number of years, they will not sue no matter how negligent the doctor was or how injured the person is.  Interesting theory.  Maybe has some weight.

Though, the article then gets into, as I have touched upon before, the real reason, I believe, for the lack of lawsuits against doctors.  Simply, unless the injury is significant, it is cost prohibitive to bring a lawsuit.  As a defense attorney notes in the article, "if the case is meritorious but the recovery is likely to be small, they [injured party] don't sue because they can't find a lawyer willing to take the case."

Exactly.  Injured people have essentially been legislated out of otherwise viable claims.  Politicians case be smart, and those drafting their agendas as well.  They have not "closed" the doors to justice - an injured person's day in court.  Instead, they make it cost an incredible sum for an injured person to pursue a case, which effects a lawyer's ability to take the case, thus ensuring no lawsuit.  It is a prohibition on access to justice -- just not an overt one.

These articles from the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel are enlightening in regards to the amount of money the Wisconsin Injured Patients and Families Fund has to defend lawsuits, and to the problems faced by injured parties, along with a complete lack of access to the courts, in Wisconsin.

http://www.jsonline.com/watchdog/watchdogreports/medical-mediation-doesnt-always-provide-closure-for-families-b99324156z1-270618031.html


http://www.jsonline.com/business/medical-malpractice-laws-rulings-leave-family-searching-after-dads-death-b99379764z1-281241261.html

http://www.jsonline.com/news/opinion/wisconsin-patients-wait-as-money-in-compensation-fund-grows-b99416878z1-287400801.html

Or this article that show Governor Walker's attempt to essentially shape the Wisconsin Supreme Court to do his biding.

http://www.prwatch.org/news/2015/02/12729/walker-moves-cut-pay-wisconsin-chief-justice-budget-bill


And, this is not just an access to justice for medical malpractice problem.  Legislation is coming from all angles to block as much access as possible for injured parties.  Binding, forced arbitration, more caps on damages, re-working Wisconsin's Worker's Compensation system which has been in place since the early 1900's and both parties agree does not need to be changed.

So, the question then is, as more and more laws to help injured people get changed to protect doctors, corporations, cities, etc., and not the injured person, when bad things happen to people, how is anyone going to help them?

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